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Mental Health Moment on break

It’s summer, and my son is getting married this month! 💞❤

So I’m taking a short break from new episodes of Mental Health Moment.

I’ll return with NEW EPISODES on June 24.

Until then, here’s a few early episodes you may have missed!

 

Episode 2: Sticky note wins the day

 

 

 

Episode 3: Don’t stress exercise

 

 

 

Episode 4: Deep breathing isn’t just “take a deep breath”

 

 

 

Episode 5: Five things (and also 20 things) to reduce stress

 

 

 

Don’t forget to subscribe to hear future episodes of Mental Health Moment wherever you are! 

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

in your inbox every day.

 





 

Thanks for listening!

I’d love to hear what you think!

  • Leave a note below or ask me a question in the comment section below.
  • Share this episode on Pinterest, Facebook, and LinkedIn .

Help spread the message about good mental health!

 

Ep 66: You can change your brain to reduce your stress

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Did you know you can change your brain? We tend to think we are stuck with the brain we’re born with. But apparently brains love to change, grow and regenerate.

There is so much you can do to set your brain up to help you respond to your challenges.

Learn about a couple of ways to do that in today’s episode.

You can listen to this episode right here! 👆

And don’t forget to subscribe to hear future episodes of Mental Health Moment wherever you are! 

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

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Full transcript 👇

Ep 66: You Can Change Your Brain to Reduce Your Stress

Hi. I’m Lori Miller and this is your Mental Health Moment.

If you were like me you grew up believing that you were born with only so many brain cells.

If you destroy them, through drugs or alcohol, for example, you don’t ever get them back.

I’m not sure exactly how many brain cells I was born with, but I’m not keen on losing any more than I have to.

Thanks to some diligent science people, however, we now know that idea was wrong.

Your brain can change and compensate for many things life throws at it.

It turns out, your brain is highly flexible and constantly works to adapt to the new requirements placed on it.

The clinical term for this is neuroplasticity, and you see it all the time in real life.

  • Recovery after a stroke is the brain adapting and making new connections to relearn some basic functions.
  • Sudden loss of hearing in one ear may strengthen hearing in the other ear to compensate for the loss.
  • Phantom limb sensation experienced by amputees is plasticity at work.

Apparently your brain learns how to rewire itself, change directions and find alternate pathways all the time.

But plasticity isn’t just limited to injuries or damage. There’s a very practical side to this that can help you in your daily life.

Your brain can also adapt to new ways of thinking and behaving.

You might think you can’t change some of your behaviors related to depression or anxiety, but you can set up your brain to help you be more successful in your efforts.

The patterns and thinking habits that have been with you since you started using reason and logic as a wee youngster are ingrained as pathways in your brain. It’s what you learned from your earły environmental influences.

It’s just how you’ve “always been.”

You can play a role in getting your brain to change those pathways in a few simple ways.

What do you pay attention to?

What you focus on is a stimulus to your brain.

Think about that for a second.

Every time you give your attention to something, you are stimulating your brain toward some action.

You can’t choose the thoughts that pop in your head. But you can choose how long you focus on those thoughts and how you decide to handle them.

  • If you are struggling with depression, and you focus on a negative thought or situation, your brain just keeps going down the path you take it.
  • If you’ve been struggling for a while, your brain doesn’t have to work that hard to take you down the familiar path.
  • It’s been in this part of the labyrinth before.

Your brain likes this path of least resistance because it can conserve energy for something else.

But when you choose to focus on an adaptive thought, or a positive thought, your brain lights up.

It now has to fire differently and make new neural connections to accommodate the new activity.

It’s like when you suddenly realize Google Maps is taking you on a detour and you don’t know where the next rest stop might be…and you just finished a Big Gulp.

In order to meet the new demand, your brain has to entertain the thought of a different path and determine what resources it needs to get there.

If you manage to keep your focus on more helpful, adaptive thoughts, your brain gets comfortable with that path and it’s easier to override the negative, now less used, paths.

And you just mastered a new thinking skill that will help improve your mood.

Move your body

I know I bring this up a lot, but you have to move your body every day to even have a shot at feeling better. You have to disturb your homeostasis. Here’s another compelling reason why.

Exercise prevents shrinkage. 😳 Okay, what?

  • If you’re still alive, then your brain is aging
  • If you’re not exercising, then your brain is shrinking.
  • The gray matter, the part we laymen call “brain,” is reducing in volume.
  • Exercise increases the volume of gray matter in your brain and reverses that shrinkage.
  • Apparently size does matter. 😜

This gray matter growth also can contribute to the formation of new blood vessels.

And the best part: exercise can help your brain regenerate new cells, a process called neurogenesos.

All this adds up to improved cognitive function.

Studies show one of the best ways to prevent age related cognitive decline is to exercise.

Higher intensity is best but anything will help.

So there you go. Time to take your shrinking brain to the gym. 🏃‍♀️

The research is still a little back and forth on this one, but meditation appears to have significant changes on the brain.

Apparently just one session can improve blood flow into the prefrontal cortex, which is where all your thinking and planning lives.

But over the long term, meditation may provoke some structural changes in the areas that regulate emotions and assist in learning and memory.

Doesn’t that sound nice?

Meditation doesn’t necessarily mean a long, drawn out session. You can find a space somewhere in your day and meditate for just a few minutes.

This can lower your fight or flight responses, which can help you manage anxiety and depression.

There are a gazillion meditation apps for your phone. Try one and see if it doesn’t improve your focus and increase your ability to handle the stuff in your day.

And remember, over time, your highly plastic brain will come to consider this more calm, relaxed state as the norm.

Your brain is a marvelous machine.

You get to carry it around in your head all the time. Only you know what’s truly going on in there.

Please know that at the end of the day, you can change and control what you do with your marvelous brain. It can be shaped and molded to help you be at your best every day.

Make an intentional and purposeful effort to change your brain and see what happens!

You can catch episodes of Mental Health Moment by visiting mymentalhealthmoment.com. Don’t forget to subscribe to Mental Health Moment on Amazon Alexa, Apple podcast, Google podcast and Spotify. Just search for “Mental Health Moment with Lori Miller.”

If you want Mental Health Moment delivered right to your inbox, visit mymentalhealthmoment.com to sign up to get these delivered to your email every day.

If you’re STILL wanting for more, you can find articles and videos about stress and mental health, by visiting my website at LoriMiller.me.

Thanks for listening!

I’d love to hear what you think!

  • Leave a note below or ask me a question in the comment section below.
  • Share this episode on Pinterest, Facebook, and LinkedIn .

Help spread the message about good mental health!

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

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Ep 65: What is self-care, really?

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Healthy self-care is a key part of good mental health. But what does self-care look like for you? Is it an event you schedule when life overwhelms you?

Or is it a daily practice that lets you invest in and care for yourself?

Here are a few ways to understand how self-care can fit into your crazy, busy life.

You can listen to this episode right here! 👆

And don’t forget to subscribe to hear future episodes of Mental Health Moment wherever you are! 

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

in your inbox every day.

 





Full transcript 👇

Ep 65: What is self-care really?

Hi. I’m Lori Miller and this is your Mental Health Moment.

Self-care is definitely one of the most important things you can do to feel healthy and strong, physically and mentally.

But when I say self-care, what images come up in your mind?

  • Maybe you see a lady with cucumbers on her eyes getting a facial while holding a mimosa.
  • Or maybe you see someone sitting Crisscross applesauce on a yoga mat meditating next to the beach.
  • Or maybe you see a group of women out having Sunday brunch and laughing together.

Self-care is indeed all of those things. But it’s not limited to the things that you set aside special time for.

The whole point of self-care is to replenish and recharge. That means self-care has to happen on a regular basis.

So while a spa day or a Sunday brunch with your besties is a terrific way to let your hair down and connect, that kind of self-care can get expensive if you do it a lot.

And I’m guessing it’s pretty hard for everybody to schedule too.

Here’s the thing to know.

Self-care isn’t about indulging yourself.

Self-care is about giving back to yourself and filling your own cup.

Every day.

I’m guessing you’re pouring from that cup a lot every day.

As a therapist I have to be very intentional about self-care to make sure I have what I need to help others every day.

So for me that means things like exercise, good sleep, and eating healthy food. Those three are gold standard ways to care for yourself every day.

If you have a stressful job with a lot of responsibility or you’re a caregiver for an aging parent, you absolutely should be doing these three things every day.

That’s you caring for yourself in the same way that you’re caring for others.

Self-care can take on some other forms, though.

I’ve said many times before that reading is my self-care. This has been the case since I was old enough to pick up a book or newspaper.

Reading gives me knowledge, increases my vocabulary, and helps me find meaning and insight in my own experiences.

When I feel like I need to recharge, reading is the first place I go.

Of course, I grab my iPad to read now. 🤓💻

Reading allows me to give back to myself and invest in what I might need tomorrow to show up for others.

But it means that when I’m reading I’m not taking care of some other things that are on my list. Maybe even some kind of important things.

This isn’t selfish. Taking time to read is an act of empathy and compassion towards myself.

It’s my way of saying to myself that I care about you and want you to be well.

As a society we really suck at this kind of self-care.

We just go from thing, to thing, to thing with no break in between.

Unfortunately we have taught this to our youngest generations. Already, Generations Y, Z, and whoever is coming after that is already struggling with anxiety from being overscheduled and worried about the future.

Back in the day, we kind of had some natural buffers for our stress.

  • We walked more because we only had one car.
  • Before TV really took hold, people went outside to enjoy nature and talk to their neighbors after the day’s work was done.
  • There was kind of a natural rhythm of self-care built in to the day.

Only we didn’t call it self-care. We just called it… Wednesday. 😜

Now we keep pushing so hard until we kind of melt down and feel like we need a large block of time to recuperate from everything.

So we schedule a spa day, and we enjoy it.

But how do you keep from getting to this point where you feel like you have to set an entire day aside to recover from your life?

You need a better strategy.

You need to have a plan to make sure you have what you need every day to stay resilient to all the random stuff that happens to you.

How do you find time for self-care in your busy day?

Well, you can schedule it in your calendar just like anything else.

I know that sounds kind of like a duh, but it can be challenging to pull off because it may not feel as important as your son’s soccer practice.

And maybe the practice does run late or you run into some other scheduling conflict.

But when you see that entry on the calendar, then you have to do something with it. Scheduling it at least puts self-care on your radar.

Create a recurring entry on your calendar for whatever will help you hit the pause button in your push to get stuff done.

Try making it the first thing you put in your schedule when you do your planning.

Another way to find more time for self-care is to simply tag it on to something else.

I used to work really close to the beach so I commuted home on the road that ran right next to the beach instead of taking the busy highway.

I made a point of stopping by the beach most days when I started back home.

It wasn’t an extra trip because I had to go by there to get home anyway. I didn’t bring a whole bunch of beach paraphernalia with me so I couldn’t make the trip a thing.

I just got out of the car and sat in the sand, business casual wardrobe and all.

That time became a buffer to help purge some of the day’s stress before I went home. My family learned to appreciate it too because it meant I brought a little less stress home with me.

What are some things you can do to recharge your battery in the middle of other stuff you’re already doing?

  • Can you enjoy a quick browse through your favorite bookstore while you’re waiting for your son’s soccer practice to be over (do we even still have bookstores?)
  • Maybe you can you sit in your car and enjoy your favorite smoothie for a few minutes while you’re out running errands.

You’re the master here.

Get creative and find ways to inject self-care in your day in small ways.

If you feel like life is running you over and you’re having trouble dealing with everyday stuff, getting a handle on your self-care is a good place to start.

Because when life gets real, self-care is sometimes the first thing to go.

Good self-care will be the deciding factor in you feeling less overwhelmed about your life.

Find ways to care for yourself every day and see if you don’t feel more empowered to make better decisions in your life.

You can catch episodes of Mental Health Moment by visiting mymentalhealthmoment.com. Don’t forget to subscribe to Mental Health Moment on Amazon Alexa, Apple podcast, Google podcast and Spotify. Just search for “Mental Health Moment with Lori Miller.”

If you want Mental Health Moment delivered right to your inbox, visit mymentalhealthmoment.com to sign up to get these delivered to your email every day.

If you’re STILL wanting for more, you can find articles and videos about stress and mental health, by visiting my website at LoriMiller.me.

Thanks for listening!

I’d love to hear what you think!

  • Leave a note below or ask me a question in the comment section below.
  • Share this episode on Pinterest, Facebook, and LinkedIn .

Help spread the message about good mental health!

Here’s what else I’m saying about this topic!

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

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Give yourself a Mental Health Moment every day!

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Amazon Alexa skill - Mental Health Moment with Lori Miller

Sometimes you need some encouragement right at the top of the day so you can stay focused on what will keep you energized and productive. 🌝

I’m excited to debut my Alexa skill, Mental Health Moment with Lori Miller.

It’s a little shot in the arm to start your day.

Every day I’ll talk about small ways you can inject a bit of sanity in your day.

If you have an Amazon Echo you can enable Mental Health Moment in the Alexa store. You can also download the Alexa app on your phone or tablet and enable the skill there.

Check out all the details on my Amazon skill page.

Feel free to leave me a review. I’d love to know what you think! 🤔

Ep 3: Don’t stress exercise

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Sometimes we stress exercise because it feels like one more thing we have to do, and we have to do it well. Maybe we’re making it too hard.

How do you make exercise work for you in spite of all the craziness around you?

Don’t stress it. Just move!

You can listen to this episode right here! 👆

And don’t forget to subscribe to hear future episodes of Mental Health Moment wherever you are! 

 

Get Mental Health Moment 🎧

in your inbox every day.

 





Full transcript 👇

Ep 3: Don't stress exercise

Hi I’m Lori Miller and this is your mental health moment.

Unless you’ve been living under a heavy rock somewhere, you know exercise is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to boost your mental health.

Doing some kind of physical activity every day:

  • reduces stress,
  • lowers that anxiety that’s always with you
  • and boosts your resilience to some of the nonsense in your day.

But exercise can be the hardest thing to fit in to a busy day.

It’s like one more thing to put on your list, isn’t it?

So how do you make exercise work for you in spite of all the craziness around you?

Don’t stress exercise. Just move.

The object here isn’t to add stress by feeling like you have more to do.

Just make some simple changes today to weave physical activity into your schedule, and make sure you do something.

Here’s a couple of suggestions:

First, plan for some physical activity when you have know you won’t have other obligations tugging at you.

This may mean getting up an extra 15 minutes to take a short walk, yes, even in the snow.

Or maybe you can swap out some of your normal morning coffee time to go for that walk.

Personally, I’d rather get up a tiny bit earlier than take any of my precious coffee time.

But do what works for you.

Maybe it makes more sense for you to pull up a short video on YouTube while dinner’s in that new InstaPot you got for Christmas. You have to wait anyway.

Why not use that time to invest a few minutes in yourself?

Find those little pockets of time. They do add up.

Second, don’t make it a formal thing.

Everybody’s always doing a plan or following a program. Regular exercise is less about having a beach body and more about just moving already.

Don’t focus on the number of days a week or the intensity or all that stuff.

Focus on an activity.

Things like:

  • A neighborhood bike ride
  • Yard work, or shoveling snow
  • A quick walk around your office building at lunchtime
  • Dancing. Yes, dance while the InstaPot’s cooking that roast!

High five yourself for the activity.

Move on with the day.

Then just do that again tomorrow.

That’s it. No pressure.

Pick something you can do today and just do that.

Keep it simple. And get moving.

For articles and videos about stress and mental health, visit my website at Lorimiller.me.

Here’s what else I’m saying about this topic

 

 

Thanks for listening!

I’d love to hear what you think!

  • Leave a note below or ask me a question in the comment section below.
  • Share this episode on Pinterest, Facebook, and LinkedIn .

Help spread the message about good mental health!

 

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How to use exercise to battle holiday stress

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Use exercise to battle holiday stress - lorimiller.me

This may be the most wonderful time of the year, but it also can be the most challenging in terms of staying on track with the things that help make your life work.

Exercise, good nutrition, sleep and routine (see also: the components of the anxiety and depression toolkit) all suddenly find themselves beneath the trash heap of the merry and joyous eating season.

For me, the most tempting thing to do is give up exercise. I’m busy with added social events, and opportunities to spend time with others. I love that!

But after all that eating the last thing I want to do is move. Like, at all.

So that late day workout I swore allegiance to gives way to “just one” delicious buckeye and yummy barbeque sliders with friends.

Another workout busted.

It creates a bit of a cycle, I’m afraid.

Exercise matters and it matters big time.

Focusing on exercise is one of the first things I mention to people struggling with anxiety and depression. It’s one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to affect your mental health.

And it’s a great place to start because everybody can absolutely do something.

Exercise has a direct effect on your mood, helps reduce anxious feelings, increases serotonin in the brain, which can help you sleep, and increases your resilience to stress, which I think we all agree can go through the roof this time of year.

The American Psychological Association has coined this the “exercise effect.” In fact, the APA is encouraging mental health providers to make sure they include exercise as part of their treatment plans.

I consider exercise really a non-negotiable.  Apparently, I’m a broken record on this one.

Yet even as the words are coming out of my mouth to my clients, I realize I am just as crafty in my excuses to duck out of it during the holidays.

So with all the added activity and pressure of the season, how do you make exercise work for you when you need it most?

Don’t stress it. Make some simple changes to ensure you do something and don’t just go to zero effort.

Do it when you have few legitimate obligations.

Don’t roll your eyes, but really, it’s true that exercising in the morning is a great solution. It’s not the easiest to get started, but you have a better shot of making it happen before the day breaks.

You really do.

Unless you have some graveyard-style job, you always have the option to get up a bit earlier.

You won’t die from it, I promise.

For the time crunched, this is really the best way to find extra time in your day. Everyone else (hopefully) is still asleep, and the world hasn’t started its vicious merry-go-round yet.

Then, you are done! Yes!

The whole day is in front of you, and you are mentally and physically poised to handle whatever the day may bring.

And when unexpected plans come up, you can just go and not feel guilty about not exercising yet again.

Focus on doing something every day.

It’s great to try to hit physical activity a certain number of times a week, but right now that kind of contained thinking may create too much anxiety for you.

That’s just one more thing to track during the busy season.

Don’t make it a formal thing.

Instead, break it down and focus on just doing something today.

Anything. It all adds up.

  • Take a walk.
  • Go for a bike ride.
  • Go ice skating.
  • Go for a quick swim.
  • Do some yard work (assuming your yard isn’t full of snow. If so, grab a shovel, my friend.)
  • Do some yoga.
  • Dance. I hear that’s a thing.
  • Try an at-home exercise program (there are a million of them streaming on Hulu, Roku, etc.)

When you’re done, high five yourself. You did it!

Then just do that again tomorrow. That’s it.

No pressure.

Me after my Monday morning workout. See how happy I am? 🙂

Pardner up.

There is power in leveraging others to help you with this. Having someone hold you accountable to exercise works because nobody wants to be the one who “no-shows” in the relationship.

I would suggest picking the person in your life who is not afraid to challenge you (in a good way, of course).

Set up time to exercise with someone else and simply don’t leave ’em hangin.’ Once you get together, you’ll have a good time, I’m sure.

Honestly, today I was so tired, it’s Monday, and it’s raining. I felt like these things gave me some very high moral ground to stay in bed.

But my husband and partner in all things life wouldn’t let me. He’s also a mental health practitioner so he gave me zero wiggle room on this.

I needed that.

And when I was tempted to slack off a bit during the workout, he was there to cheer me on.

Hopefully I did the same for him.

Don’t overthink it; just do it.

Of course, you may want to set good, hard goals for exercise in the new year, but you don’t have to wait for January.

That’s just another excuse to not take action right now.

It’s not a terrible time to start exercising if you haven’t been already.

Don’t go crazy or injure yourself.

Keep it simple.

Just get (or keep) moving during the holidays.

Sources:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/12/exercise.aspx

 

 

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3 totally doable ways to help you bend and flex with your life

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How many goals did you set this year to improve your resilience?

*Crickets.*

Not at the top of your list?

Admittedly, resilience gets crowded out by the more action-y stuff we focus on as the new year starts.

  • We set goals to lose weight (again).
  • We make plans to improve our professional skills, or find that dream job.
  • You Type A folks may even be launching a life plan this year to go after like, you know, everything, in your whole entire life. (That sounds easy enough.)

We almost never consider our own resilience, much less how to practice and use it when we need it.

What is resilience, anyway?

We tend to think of resilience as the ability to bounce back from a challenge, and that’s partly true.

  • When life knocks you down, resilience gives you the wherewithal to get back up.
  • When life hands you lemons, you make lemonade (if you have enough lemons thrown at you to make a decent amount of lemonade, you might be having a rough go at it, just sayin’…).

But resilience also is being mentally and emotionally prepared to identify the resources available to you when things get challenging.

If you’re stressed, tired, and full of negative thoughts, it’s hard to care about finding creative ways to get past a difficult situation.

Resilience then, can be more of a mindset that allows you to see the path forward and empowers you to actually walk down that path.

And, as with many things in life, it’s better for you if you build that mindset ahead of time. #sorrythatsjusthowitis

So, how do you build resilience?

The best part is that many of the things we already know about a healthy lifestyle are the very things that build resilience. It’s like life skills double-dipping.

Here are three really good ones you can practice every day:

1. Exercise

Exercise is a most outstanding way to build resilience because it generates blood flow to the brain’s frontal lobe, right behind your forehead. The frontal lobe handles things like planning, logic and organization. These come in handy when you need to make a healthy decision.

Exercise also relieves the negative emotions related to stress. After a long workday, just a 10-minute walk with your dog can boost your mood for several hours (and probably your dog’s mood, too).

I’ll bet you make better decisions about your life when you can stay clear-headed, relaxed and in a positive mood.

And the best part is, you don’t need special skills. You just have to move.

Can you move? Carry on…

2. Be quiet

Quiet time lets us focus on our thoughts and try to figure stuff out.

Thanks to our devices and a limitless supply of entertainment in almost all areas of our lives, we no longer have to suffer the plight of being bored or reflective.

Our brains and souls are drinking daily from a firehose of data with little time to figure out if any of it even makes sense (spoiler alert: most of it doesn’t).

And studies are bearing out that our marvelous brains are starting to notice. Our daily experience now includes:

  • reduced memory and attention spans,
  • constant dopamine rushes from social media interactions, and
  • reduced productivity from multi-tasking.

Finding some time to step away, in some way, for a few minutes each day allows mental space for creativity and problem solving.

You can call it mindfulness or a spiritual practice.

Just carve out 15 quiet minutes for yourself to:

  • Pray,
  • Let your mind wander,
  • Breathe deeply,
  • Ask yourself questions about what you’re feeling,
  • Journal,
  • Draw, or
  • Let the sacred words of wiser ones than you pour into your soul.

Having said that, resilience does require some boundaries on all that thinking.

3. What are you thinking?

While we can’t help the thoughts that pop in to our minds, we do have complete control over what we allow to roil and take root.

Allowing unchallenged thoughts to linger can quickly become rumination, obsessing over the same negative thoughts until you make yourself feel really bad.

Like a cow chewing its cud.

Rumination is one of the hardest thinking habits to change.

  • It’s never forward-focused.
  • It always dwells on past wrongs or failures.
  • It’s a natural predator of resilience.

Resilience, however, requires you to

  • Find your strengths,
  • Look for possibilities, and
  • Focus on what you can bring to the situation.

So in order to bolster your resilience, you’re going to have to do a whole lot better than rumination.

Start being the gatekeeper for your marvelous brain.

How much news do you consume?

What’s more backwards-focused than the news? Its very nature is things that have happened in the past.

The news is now particularly negative and vicious, and it feeds many of our anxieties about what’s not working in our lives.

Take a week off from it and see if it doesn’t change how you think.

What positive, forward-focused things are you reading or listening to?

Focus on material that will build your skills, build your faith, or help you build a resilient attitude about life.

Self-help is a multi-billion dollar industry. There’s something out there for what you need.

I like listening to motivational speaker Les Brown because he reminds me that I am responsible for my own change, which is a little scary, but that I can totally do it. Yes!

Who do you pay attention to?

You’ve heard it before. You are the sum total of the five people you associate with.

What do your five talk about? Do their comments and conversations build people up, or tear down?

Do they always focus on what’s gone wrong? And who’s gone wrong?

This will have an effect on your thinking, I promise.

You may need to upgrade your five.

Resilience is a marathon.

Keep in mind that building resilience is a lifelong endeavor.

You will never do the end zone dance of resilience, and there’s no Golden Globe for the Most Resilient Performance in a Life Drama (or Comedy).

So, go ahead, put resilience on your list of goals to crush in the new year, but you won’t be able to really check it off.

I know, that’s annoying.

What you can check off, though, is the fact that you are helping yourself a little bit each day to build the courage to face your challenges and take action.

That’s golden.

Spend this year improving your ability to bend and flex with your life.

#alwaysbeflexin

#alwaysbelearnin

Sources: